Can I deduct work clothes?

Ask NJMoneyHelp

Photo: pedrojperez/morguefile.com

Q. I’m thinking of taking a new job and I would have to wear suits every day. I own one suit. Can I deduct the costs as necessary and unreimbursed?
— Working Joe

A. Congratulations on the job.

Your question is a good one, but it’s not as simple as you’re hoping.

The IRS under certain circumstances allows employees to deduct unreimbursed business expenses, said Bernie Kiely, a certified financial planner and certified public accountant with Kiely Capital Management in Morristown.

“These expenses are subject to a 2 percent limitation,” Kiely said. “This means if your unreimbursed employee business expenses are greater than 2 percent of your adjusted gross income, you can deduct the amount that exceeds 2 percent.

According to IRS Publication 529, “Miscellaneous Deductions,” you might be able to deduct the following expenses:

1. Business bad debt of an employee.
2. Business liability insurance premiums.
3. Damages paid to a former employer for breach of an employment contract.
4. Depreciation on a computer your employer requires you to use in your work.
5. Dues to a chamber of commerce if membership helps you do your job.
6. Dues to professional societies.
7. Educator expenses.
8. Home office or part of your home used regularly and exclusively in your work.
9. Job search expenses in your present occupation.
10. Laboratory breakage fees.
11. Legal fees related to your job.
12. Licenses and regulatory fees.
13. Malpractice insurance premiums.
14. Medical examinations required by an employer.
15. Occupational taxes.
16. Passport for a business trip.
17. Repayment of an income aid payment received under an employer’s plan.
18. Research expenses of a college professor.
19. Rural mail carriers’ vehicle expenses.
20. Subscriptions to professional journals and trade magazines related to your work.
21. Tools and supplies used in your work.
22. Travel, transportation, meals, entertainment, gifts, and local lodging related to your work.
23. Union dues and expenses.
24. Work clothes and uniforms if required and not suitable for everyday use.
25. Work-related education.

No. 24 on the list is the one we’re talking about.

You can deduct the cost and upkeep of work clothes if the you must wear them as a condition of your employment, and if the clothes aren’t suitable for everyday wear.

“The second requirement is the stickler of why most workers can’t deduct their work clothes,” Kiely said.

Workers who may be able to deduct the cost and upkeep of work clothes include delivery workers, firefighters, health care workers, law enforcement officers, letter carriers, professional athletes and transportation workers.

Musicians and entertainers can deduct the cost of theatrical clothing and accessories that aren’t suitable for everyday wear, Kiely said.

Interestingly, he said, work clothing consisting of white cap, white shirt or white jacket, white bib overalls and standard work shoes, which a painter is required by his union to wear on the job, isn’t distinctive in character or in the nature of a uniform. Similarly, the costs of buying and maintaining blue work clothes worn by a welder at the request of a foreman aren’t deductible.

Kiely said you can deduct the cost of protective clothing required in your work, such as safety shoes or boots, safety glasses, hard hats, and work gloves. Examples of workers who may be required to wear safety items include carpenters, cement workers, chemical workers, electricians, fishing boat crew members, machinists, oil field workers, pipe fitters, steamfitters and truck drivers.

“Unfortunately for you, suits, white shirts and ties are for many ordinary street clothes and are suitable for everyday care,” Kiely said. “You can wear business attire to weddings, funerals or church on Sundays.”

Email your questions to moc.p1490603470leHye1490603470noMJN1490603470@ksA1490603470.

NJMoneyHelp.com presents certain general financial planning principles and advice, but should never be viewed as a substitute for obtaining advice from a personal professional advisor who understands your unique individual circumstances.